WINTERSTATIONS

 

Part of a Co-Learning Research Project, Humber ITAL Centre for Teaching and Learning

Winterstations is an annual public art competition that challenges designers worldwide to reimagine Toronto's lifeguard stations as a basis for winter art. Hundreds of submissions come from international schools, local artists, designers and architects. Designs were submitted from all over the world, with eight being selected.

The Illusory is built with reflective panels that, once visitors step inside, shows misconstrued, mirroring illustrations of themselves and the space around them. This project was initiated by Cole Swanson. The design process was led by Cole Swanson and Marcin Kedzior and involved students in the interior design, industrial design, media studies, and art foundation programs at Humber ITAL. The construction process, also involving Humber College students, was led by Cole Swanson and Eliot Callaghan—a SDBU ally, a professional builder and fabricator.

 

Media Coverage

DesignLinesToronto LifeNow MagazineToronto SunIndie88Toronto StarCBCAzure BlogTOGlobe and Mail, GoodHoodToronto.com 

Project Team

Marcin Kedzior, Craig Crane, Cole Swanson, Eliot Callaghan, Jenessa Atkinson, Aaron Bavle, Jason Carreiro, Gabriela Merka-Derez, Kimberly Michelle Czornodolskyj, Karun Ramani, Trish Roque, Roxanne Van Dam, Qiao Wang


 

Lakeshore Community Garden, Barsa Kelly

 

Lakeshore Community Garden, Barsa Kelly

Funding Mechanism: Humber ITAL College & Community Partnership (HCCP) Grant

The project was developed as part of a strategic collaboration created to address the issue of food security in Ward 6 (South Etobicoke), a low-income pocket recently defined as an Urban Priority area by the City of Toronto. The students created the idea of Pods, micro community gardens that could be dispersed within the local community. A typical Pod displaces a 30’ x 60’ footprint and includes four key elements: mobile raised planters, rain water harvesters, a market kiosk, and a social gathering area. We expect the Pods will become part of a network of local public spaces and micro community hubs, managed by The Gardens Advisory Council. To find out more about The Gardens please visit their website www.gardenslakeshore.ca.

The same project team prototyped a typical Pod in collaboration with local youth on the site of Barsa Kelly/Cari-Can Co-operative Homes Inc. in South Etobicoke. This demonstration project presents a raised planter network and a market kiosk with an iconic red barn likeness, a referential image derived from our design charrettes and consultations with local youth. It is likely that the market kiosk in subsequent Pods will take on a new image appropriate to its context or project parameters.

The collaboration successfully engaged the local youth, parents, and community members as participants in the Pod design. They subsequently helped in the planting, maintenance, and harvesting of the vegetable crops under the tutelage of Monika Meulman (a volunteer gardener). The harvested produce was delivered to families, local residents, and churches for consumption. Moving forward, the Pod will also provide infrastructure for the Good Food Market program offered to the community by the LAMP Community Health Centre. The results of the harvest revealed that a typical Pod, such as this prototype, should produce 860 kg of vegetable produce (40 planters). Normative standards from the World Health Organization and alike indicate that the average apparent per capita consumption of vegetables in Canada is 114 kg per year. Thus, a typical Pod should provide enough produce to feed 7.7 persons per year.


 

Pefferlaw

 

Pefferlaw, Toronto

Funding Mechanism: Industry Partner

This experimental dwelling was designed and constructed in collaboration with numerous industry and institutional partners including Ryerson University. It articulates the fundamental underpinnings of the Cradle-to-Cradle paradigm and the Passive House standard. It was conceived as extremely energy efficient (aiming to cut energy costs by 90%), adaptable, resilient, low maintenance, user friendly, future proofed, healthy, with low CO2 emissivity.

The project explores technologies and methodologies such as passive solar design, solar-ready PV and thermal systems, low-voltage lighting, green roofs, high-efficiency heating-cooling with radiant and ERV systems, high performance envelopes, high performance windows, low-carbon concrete, water management, water conservation, grey water, and water harvesting with cisterns.The house operates as a vehicle for data extraction and contains an extensive array of green design features, materials and new technologies that on display so that the public can experience as part of Green Doors Open Toronto each fall.


 

Creative Farm

 

Funding Mechanism: Industry Partner

In this project the BINT204 students designed and built a prototypical eco-cabin as the first of 10 sustainable buildings that were to be built as part of an intentional community near Orangeville. The prototype was designed, prefabricated, and mocked-up in and adjacent to the P building on the Humber North Campus. Subsequently, the community’s forces deconstructed the building and delivered it to their site for re-construction in the spring of 2012.


 

Smart Home

 

Smart Home

Funding Mechanism: Industry Partner

This experimental dwelling was designed and constructed in collaboration with numerous industry and institutional partners including Ryerson University. It articulates the fundamental underpinnings of the Cradle-to-Cradle paradigm and the Passive House standard. It was conceived as extremely energy efficient (aiming to cut energy costs by 90%), adaptable, resilient, low maintenance, user friendly, future proofed, healthy, with low CO2 emissivity.

The project explores technologies and methodologies such as passive solar design, solar-ready PV and thermal systems, low-voltage lighting, green roofs, high-efficiency heating-cooling with radiant and ERV systems, high performance envelopes, high performance windows, low-carbon concrete, water management, water conservation, grey water, and water harvesting with cisterns.

The house operates as a vehicle for data extraction and contains an extensive array of green design features, materials and new technologies that on display so that the public can experience as part of Green Doors Open Toronto each fall.


 

CANOPY COHOUSING

Canopy Cohousing, Toronto

In collaboration with Canopy, the first Cohousing organization in Toronto, students developed speculative urban and architecture schemes for six possible sites in Toronto. By studying the Danish idea of bofællesskab, or living community, students attempted to articulate an alternate way of living in which 12-36 housholds share outdoor property and a common house which features spaces such as a shared dining hall and kitchen, library, music rooms, playrooms, daycare etc. This community has the ability to create a micro-economic unit by sharing other tools, resources, and buying things in bulk. Cohousing could emerge as a viable alternate to either the isolating suburban development or the high-rise condominuim developments in the current social and politcal-economic climate in Toronto.


 

Come Up To My Room 

This furniture and fabrication studio was led by Craig Crane and Liz Fenuta. The students exhibited their work at the Gladstone Hotel. 


 

PAVILIONS

With a focus on experimental form and social space, students proposed speculative ideas for the courtyard of Humber College. Elements of one of the student proposals was chosen and implemened as part of a new built amphitheatre on campus.